Last edited by Akinoran
Monday, May 18, 2020 | History

2 edition of Basketry from the Ozette Village archaeological site found in the catalog.

Basketry from the Ozette Village archaeological site

Dale R. Croes

Basketry from the Ozette Village archaeological site

a technological, functional, and comparative study

by Dale R. Croes

  • 266 Want to read
  • 33 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Indian baskets -- North America.,
  • Ozette Site (Wash.) -- Antiquities.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Dale Ross Croes.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxxiii, 515 l. :
    Number of Pages515
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16722272M

    The site itself, however, has been filled, but you can view a small replica longhouse here and a plaque that marks the site. Where is the Ozette Site? The site is located just off Highway Take the to Highway to Hoki-Ozette Road, which leads to the site. When is the Ozette Site open? The site can be visited at any time. Ozette would result in nine doctoral dissertations and ten master’s theses, on subjects such as basketry, stone tools, woodworking technology, ethnobotany, and the use of fish at the site. Ozette is a beautiful and profound book, befitting the beauty and profundity of Makah culture. And Ruth Kirk is uniquely qualified as its author.

    Summary: Re-Awakening Ancient Salish Sea Basketry on the Northwest Coast of North America: A Generationally-Linked Archaeology Approach By Ed Carriere, Suquamish Elder and Master Basketmaker (Suquamish Elder and Master Basketmaker and Canoe Carver, Indianola, Washington, USA) and Dale Croes Ph.D., Wet Site Archaeologist (Adjunct Professor in the Department of .   Archaeological test pits were excavated at the Ozette site in by Richard Daugherty. However, it was not until that it became apparent what was buried there. After a storm in February , tidal erosion exposed hundreds of well preserved wooden artifacts. The excavation of the Ozette site began shortly after.

    Wikipedia article on the Ozette Indians. Ozette Archaeological Site Ozette, A North American Pompeii: Websites about archaeological excavations at the old village of Ozette. Books for sale on the Ozette Indians Ozette: Excavating a Makah Whaling Village: Archaeology book about the excavation of the Ozette village in Washington. Rooted, Revived, Reinvented: Basketry in America chronicles a history of American basketry from its origins in Native American, immigrant, and slave communities to its presence within the contemporary fine art world. Baskets convey meaning through the artists’ selection of materials; the techniques they use; and the colors, designs, patterns, and textures they employ.


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Basketry from the Ozette Village archaeological site by Dale R. Croes Download PDF EPUB FB2

Basketry from the Ozette Village Archaeological Site: A Technological, Functional, and Comparative Study: Ozette Archaeological Project Research Reports, Volume IV (Memoir) [Croes, Dale R, Stapp, Darby C, Martin, Alexandra LC] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Basketry from the Ozette Village Archaeological Site: A Technological, Functional, and Comparative Study: Ozette Price: $ REVIEW at: Over three centuries ago, a large mudslide covered a section of the. The book explores the lives of these two basketry specialists; describes their analyses of the 2,year-old basketry collection from the Biderbost wet-site, Snoqualmie Tribal Territory, currently housed at the University of Washington Burke Museum Archaeology Program; describes their development of Generationally-Linked Archaeology, a new approach that connects contemporary cultural specialists with ancient and ancestral specialists through collaboration with archaeologists Cited by: 3.

Chairman: Richard D. Daugherty In this study prehistoric basketry items, including baskets, cradles, hats, mats, and tumplines, from the Ozette Village Archaeological site and other Northwest Coast water-saturated archaeological sites are examined on three analytical Size: 4MB.

Basketry from the Ozette Village Archaeological Site: A Technological, Functional, and Comparative Study: Ozette Archaeological Project Research Reports, Volume IV.

Wet site/Dry site finds: Because of acidic soil, basketry material normally doesn't survive long in Northwest archaeological sites. But in very wet (oxygen-excluding) or very dry (water-excluding) conditions, basketry items may be well preserved for thousands of years.

The Lake Ozette Ranger Station, positioned at the north end of Ozette Lake, is approximately 3 miles from the archeological site. The land between the Pacific coast and the Ozette River was settled by a small community of Scandinavian immigrants at the end of the 19th century; these being amongst the first Europeans to establish a permanent presence on the extreme western fringe of the Olympic t city: Neah Bay, Washington.

The Makah people have inhabited Neah Bay for more than 3, years, according to archaeological research. While Neah Bay is the only centralized village on the contemporary reservation, there were five Makah villages prior to contact with non-Indians in One of these other villages was Ozette, the southernmost Makah village.

Evidence from archaeological sites along the BC coast indicates that consistent basketry construction techniques used by particular cultural groups extend far back in time. Looking northwest across the Inner Harbour from the Royal BC Museum, one can see the hotels and condominiums that now sit where the Old Songhees Reserve was located [Figure 2].

What impressed me was the fact that the excavation was being done with garden hoses, powered by generators. This was because Ozette village had been completely covered by a mudslide some years ago and the archaeologists had discovered that amongst the artifacts being found under the mud were pieces of basketry, ropes and fish-nets.

Basketry from the Ozette Village archaeological site: a technological, functional, and comparative study. Ph.D.

dissertation, Department of Anthropology, Washington State University, Pullman. Cordage from the Ozette Village archaeological site: a technological, functional, and comparative study.

Over three centuries ago a large mudslide covered a section of the Makah village of Ozette. In a waterlogged condition, thousands of wood and fiber artifacts were preserved.

Working in equal partnership with the Makah Indian Nation, Washington State University (WSU) archaeologists excavated a section of this site; I was the WSU graduate student who undertook the study of hundreds of ancient basketry.

Ozette Village in understanding the makers and users of these items. Finally, these functional assignments will be useful in comparing the functions of basketry objects from Ozette Village with those recovered from other Northwest Coast wet sites.

Ozette Basket Functional Set I. /OBI, OB2/. Perhaps the most remarkable thing about Ozette is the cultural continuity. Makahs had lived in Ozette for 2, years and probably much longer. The village had been abandoned for only 60 years, and many Makahs still went there to fish and hunt. One elder called the exposure of the longhouses by the stormAuthor: Tim Steury.

archaeological sites. He did his Ph.D. dissertation research on basketry and cordage artifacts from the Ozette Village wet site, conducted post-doctoral research by directing and publishing (WSU Press,) the research at the 3, year old Hoko River wet site.

He. Wet Site Archaeology identifies the characteristics common to all archaeological wet sites, from Newfoundland to Chile, Polynesia to Florida and from the Late Pleistoscene to the twentieth century.

The rewards and responsibilities of recovering unique assemblages from water-saturated deposits are explored. The book discusses topics including innovative excavation and preservation methods. Here, we feature an excerpt from Ozette in which Ruth Kirk describes the location of the long-occupied coastal village and the earliest stages of the world-famous archaeological excavation of the site.

(Scroll to the bottom of this post to learn about upcoming opportunities to hear Ruth Kirk discuss Ozette). The year was Other articles where Ozette site is discussed: Washington: Native Americans and early European explorers: The Ozette site, on the Olympic Peninsula, has a unique collection of well-preserved clothing, basketry, and harpoons of people who fished and hunted seals and whales years ago.

Tools of a similar culture dating from 2, years ago were also found there. The North-Central cultural dichotomy on the Northwest Coast of North America: its evolution as suggested by wet-site basketry and wooden fish-hooks - Volume 71 Issue - Dale R.

CroesCited by:   Paleoethnobotanical Processes at the Kilgii Gwaay Wet Site. In Waterlogged: Examples and Procedures for Northwest Coast Archaeologists, edited by K. Bernick. Washington State University Press, Pullman. Croes, Dale R. Volume IV: Basketry from the Ozette Village Archaeological Site.

Ozette Archaeological Project Research Reports. America's Oldest Basketry Duck Decoys These were made out of materials similar to those of the were adorned more fully to resemble ducks during hunting. The specimens dated here originate in Lovelock Cave, Nevada, just east of the Falcon Hill sites, and from an unknown location, collected during the same expedition by M.

Harrington and L. L. Loud in A reconstruction of.The Biderbost site is on the Snoqualmie River near Seattle. Sincea series of excavations have revealed a remarkable set of artifacts made from organic materials, preserved because of the water-saturated, anaerobic conditions of deposition.

The Biderbost site was the first site of its kind to be excavated in the Northwest, at least.The Ozette site remained known to archaeologists. InRichard Daugherty—then a graduate student at the University of Washington—hiked the coastal Olympic Peninsula and recorded 50 possible archaeological sites, of which Ozette suggested the most promise.